testing

HavaRunner, TestNG Reports and TDD Katas

Recently I've spent some time browsing the Net and learned about some new stuff ("new" meaning "new to me") that I would like to share with you. Let us have a look at HavaRunner, some nice TestNG reports, and TDD Katas.

 

Bad Tests, Good Tests - new book available!

I'm happy to announce the arrival of my new book! :) It is called "Bad Tests, Good Tests" and is all about writing high-quality tests.

 

Test Doubles or Test Data Builders?

One of my readers asked a question whether he should rather use test doubles (mocks) or Test Data Builders to create objects (collaborators) for testing purposes. I've decided to write down some thoughts in form of this blog post. I hope it makes things more clear.

 

Testing with Fluent APIs

The more tests I write, the more love I feel towards fluent interfaces :) I hope to write someday soon more about Test Data Builders and FEST assertions, but for now only a short list of useful fluent APIs that can help you write nice(r) tests:

 

You Shall Not Test Methods

When discussing unit tests it often happen that I hear that "unit testing is about testing methods". I do not agree, and because this is something which surfaces here and there so I think the idea deserves a comment.

 

Code Kata - Pager

A simple code kata - "Pager" - which could be used by those who try to learn programming, and especially for TDD beginners.

 

JUnit ExpectedException Rule vs. Catch-Exception

During one of my conference talks I got an interesting question: "why do you prefer to test exceptions using catch-exception library instead of using ExpectedException Rule of JUnit?". This is a good question, so let me answer.

 

Test Code Comments

Should you put comments in your tests code? Yes? No? Why?

 

Cargo + Maven + Two Tomcats

Recently I've been struggling to make Maven execute two Tomcat instances (with different applications on different ports). I decided to put a solution here so you don't have to discover it by yourself.

 

JUnit Strikes Back

Some time ago I was complaining about the stagnancy of JUnit. This project - even if used by the majority of Java developers - looked abandoned. No new releases, no activity on the mailing list, no updates on the website. However in recent weeks things started to look better. I would like to share with you some comments regarding JUnit current progress.

 
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